Storytelling Place Comanche Marker Tree

Comanche cultures and traditions are passed down from generation to generation through oral instruction and visual aids. Comanche storytellers would tell stories of Earth’s creation, and of how the wild animals or buffalo were released on earth. They told legends of mythological characters, often animals with human traits or character flaws, whose story supported the …Read More

County: Dallas

Cedar Ridge Comanche Marker Tree

Eastern Red Cedars were used by the Comanche for a number of important reasons, but this is the only tree of this species recognized as a Comanche Marker Tree. Small for a tree of its age, it proved it was old enough to qualify as a marker tree when tree cookies from its wounds provided …Read More

County: Dallas

Irving Escarpment Ridge Comanche Marker Tree

The Cross Timbers ecosystem in Irving was an area of great significance to the Comanche in the mid-eighteen hundreds. This particular area featured scenic views of Red Oaks, Post Oaks, prairie grass, wildflowers, acorns the women ground into a paste for food, native medicinal plants the healers used to make medicines, as well as a …Read More

Gateway Park Comanche Marker Tree

While it was surprising to many historians to find Comanche Marker Trees as far east as the Trinity River, the Comanche were not surprised. The “Lords of the Plains” had not forgotten the importance of “Pih-heet Pah-e-hoona”, the Comanche name for the Trinity River; the term translates as “Three Rivers.” Gateway Park and the Trinity …Read More

County: Dallas

Bird’s Fort Trail Comanche Marker Tree

Bird’s Fort Trail is an early Texas trail that was used by settlers in the mid-eighteen hundreds. The Peter’s Colony map below (courtesy of the Irving Heritage Society) shows this historic site as it was known by early travelers, including American Indians. The Comanche Indians and other tribes heavily occupied this land prior to settlement. …Read More

County: Dallas

California Crossing Comanche Marker Tree

The California Crossing Comanche Marker Tree is a pecan, which is a native species in the Dallas area. Pecan is the state tree of Texas and it is an important food source for wildlife as well as humans. The California Crossing tree is bent at a severe angle and a significant portion of the trunk …Read More

County: Dallas

The Waco Indian Village Live Oak Grove

Indigenous people have lived along the Brazos River for thousands of years. In historic times the area of present-day Waco was occupied by the Wichita Indian tribe known as the “Waco” (Spanish: Hueco). Some historians think an Indian village described by Spanish explorers in the 1500s was at the current site of the City of Waco. In 1824, Stephen Austin sent Thomas M. Duke …Read More

County: McLennan

The Plano Quadricentennial Bur Oak

Located in the Southeast section of Bob Woodruff Park, Plano’s Quadricentennial Bur Oak (previously named the Bicentennial Bur Oak) is the largest, oldest tree in the City of Plano. Originally, the tree was estimated to be 243 years old, but in 2006 strong winds took down an enormous limb forty feet from the ground. The …Read More

County: Collin

The Half-Way Oak

The massive Half-Way Oak has been a popular rest stop providing shade and comfort for those traveling on foot, horseback, wagons, and automobiles for well over 200 years[1]. Located 13 miles south of Breckenridge on U.S. 183 at a southern Stephens County rest area, the Live Oak tree got its name from its location on …Read More

County: Stephens

The Garland Memorial Cemetery Red Oak

About 100 feet from the Champion Incense Cedar tree in Garland Memorial Park along South Garland Avenue once stood the majestic State Champion Shumard Red Oak. This oak was recognized in 1999 by the Texas Forest Service as the largest of its species in the area including all of Dallas, Tarrant, and eight adjoining counties.   …Read More

County: Dallas